kerching – I’ve got a googlewhack

26th June, 2007 Comments Off on kerching – I’ve got a googlewhack

People are searching for something this very minute but I can’t tell you what it is! And I can’t tell you because this has happened twice before and made me a lot of money.

If you type what they’re searching for into Google.com or co.uk, my site returns as the number one result. Not only that, it is the only result displayed!

Wikipedia: “A Googlewhack is “a search query consisting of two words, that returns a single result.” OK, it’s not two words. It’s one word or at least one phrase.

The last time this happened I made 750 selling 5,000 worth of Charles Tyrwhitt shirts.

The previous time I made 6,000 commission selling 38,000 worth of products for a catalogue company, which I won’t name as history may repeat itself.

Today’s item is a new one. It’s the most used keyword to access my site today. The only thing not in my favour is that the landing page is not necessarily the page I’d want them to visit. So I’ve just had to reshuffle a text link and a creative or two to make it perfectly clear where the user should be.

The first sales are coming in. Whilst I’m not expecting 6k for this one, I’m eager to see if it can get to “Charles Tyrwhitt” levels.

The latest fad: Tagclouds

I like to play with the latest gimmicks and so from today I’ve introduced tag clouds to my site to display merchants top ten products.
So here’s what I’ve produced for the BBC Shop, as a visual alternative to displaying graphics and lots of text.

I actually think the above will draw some benefit to my pages. All it is, is a list of keywords presented in different sizes and presented in no particular order.

The important thing though is “keywords“. Before I introduced this cloud I had no mention of “doctor who series 3 dvd” on my site at all. I now do and those words will now be picked up by the search engines.

Yes, I could just list the same keywords and deeplink them directly into the product pages but where’s the fun in that?

Results 361 – 370 of about 132,000 for dixons discount code.

My “Dixons discount code” page ranks on page 37 of Google for the search term “dixons discount code”. My link is surrounded by familiar affiliate sites. The site is at number 366. Now I’ve visited some of those 365 sites above. I own the domain ShopCodes.co.uk, so I just had to visit www.shopcodes.org who are listed on page 33. Now come on, that site is a joke.

I’m fed up with the deal the Google hand is playing me at the moment. May 2007 was a record month for Shop Codes and I was making hundreds of pounds of commission each and every day. Conversions were at 20% and it felt like Christmas.

Then at 11:30pm 31st May, I saw that my traffic had dipped. I’ve been here before and I knew June was going to be a tough month.

So this is where we’re at now. I’m receiving little Google traffic as my pages are stuck on page 37 of the results.

hold the Dixons page up as an example. I used a ‘SEO TESTER’ tool at InstantPosition to see what was wrong with the page. It scored an excellent 37 out of 40.

“Your server settings are excellent.”

“Your page title reflects high relevance to your keyword.”

“Your keyword density is good.”

There’s obviously something up – but whatever it is, Google didn’t mind last month!

Word de-Press-ed

“Download the new version!” it shouted. And then one hour later my website was gone…

I lost one of my WordPress websites this morning when I upgraded it. My site www.1234codes.co.uk [now redirecting elsewhere] was beginning to appear on page one of some Google queries and as a result was receiving a share of new unique visitors each day. So I thought I’d update it for the first time since its February launch as most of the content was dated.

So after spending Saturday pruning the content and uploading a few new offers, my plan for Sunday was to find a new theme for it.

On my travels though, I saw that WordPress 2.2 (“The latest stable release”) was available to download. The upgrade pages couldn’t stress any more that you needed to backup the database. So I did. More than once.

Then I uploaded the software via my hosting company Servage. Clicking two little links “Autoinstaller” and “install” ruined everything. All the content had gone. No problem I thought, I’ve got backups.

However, when I tried to import them it was reporting MySQL errors at me. And that’s where the WordPress site left me. “Support is closed for the weekend.”

So I’ve 301 redirected the site to my main site and for the foreseeable future 1234codes is closed for business.

That website only ever was an experiment to see how the search engines would treat it. So I have learned something at least. Don’t ever upgrade, be happy with what you’ve got!

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